Tuesday, December 25, 2007

Two steps barrier for reaching the crowd attention on the medical 2.0 sector

I want to share with you the attached review. Its about NPD survey which tried to understand and asses the popularity of classic health 2.0 sites . Google spreadsheet, for example.

The answer is defenitive. Most of the people have never heard about them. Ninety-four percent of U.S. consumers have never heard of Web-based productivity suite alternatives. A mere 0.5 percent have substituted Web-based productivity suites for desktop software such as Microsoft Office.

What we can learn from that concerning the health 2.0 sector? :

Its going to be long journey. We have to face with "two steps barrier" :

1. The attention barrier of the general public
2.The attention barrier of the professionals ( especially physicians and researchers).

Why is it "two steps"?

The answer is found in the history of technology/web.
Physicians by definition are "late adaptors".


Business developement strategy:

1. The sectors of the consumers are maybe more attractive for the short time.
2. To act and manage your medical 2.0 platforms ( for professionals) with deep breath (and maybe pocket) and ability for making strategic decisions whuch serves you for the long term.

1 comment:

Frankie Dolan said...

Hi Uri,

How to reach out to physicians and get them interested in 2.0 is a challenge I have been puzzling over the past 6 months.

I was enjoying watching my MedWorm stats going up and up, but on detailed analysis I became disheartened - whilst site visitors to the html pages by medical institutions was indeed high, subscription to RSS feeds was, although high overall, disappointingly low amongst medical professionals - the majority of subscribers coming from the public, or else other websites.

Not all I hasten to add (there are some converted physicians out there!), but I realised that the uptake of RSS amongst physicians was not where I had previously thought and it was going to take a real push to see its use become widespread amongst medical professionals.

Good friend David Rothman gave me a few wise words of encouragement reminding me that this is the frustration that one experiences by being ahead of your time - providing a useful service before your target users realise just how useful it really is!

Key I think to a break through in the take up of 2.0 amongst physicians will be those 'in the know' working together to form some kind of overall strategy on how best to educate the masses.

- Frankie